Mike in “Death in Venice,” that allows him

            Mike Sager uses exposition, anaphora, and sensory detail in “Death in Venice,” that allows him effectively show the culture and life of gangs in Venice.

            Exposition is used from beginning to the end of the story. For instance, Big Gato describes the past of Venice in the late 1970s by mentioning how he carried a 12-gauge shotgun and ducked when he saw a car with an open window pass by after the paragraph explaining about the Shoreline Crip gang (238). This gives background information to the readers that allow them to understand the ideas the characters talk about.

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            Sager uses anaphora as another literary technique when he explains about ways how someone could disrespect someone in Venice by saying, “if he calls you a name, if he mad-dogs you, if he owes you money, if he shoots at you…(231).” Sager repeats “if he” to draw the readers attention to the details of the descriptions.

            Lastly, sensory detail is shown when Yogi smokes crack. For example, Sager writes, “As soon as he exhales, there is an instant explosion of pleasure inside his head, a rush, he says that drills a hole from the top of his scalp down to groin… (236).” This enables the audience to experience what Yogi is experiencing, which makes them engaged in the reading.

            In essence, by the use of these literary devices, Sager helps the audience analyze and understand the story in an enticing way, which does not bore them.