By and particularly in the international efforts to

By Hassan Sajid AS – A

Committee: International Atomic Energy
Agency

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Country: Argentina

As
a member of the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency,
Argentina has been a strong voice in support of nuclear non-proliferation
efforts.

Topic A:
Nuclear Disasters: Impact, Prevention and Response

Ever since the Chernobyl
nuclear disaster that occurred in 1986, numerous number of treaties were
introduced by the IAEA. Argentina has successfully signed them. Firstly,
Argentina has signed The Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1994 which is the standard
name given to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin
America and the Caribbean. In addition, the Convention
on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency
and the Convention on Early Notification
of a Nuclear Accident were introduced in 26 September 1986, and in 1990,
Argentina had signed those conventions.

According to The Argentinean
Nuclear Safety Report that was published in 2010, the standards of Nuclear Regulatory
Authority were compared against IAEA’s standards, and concluded that the “Argentine
regulatory standards are completely consistent with IAEA’s corresponding
standards, considering that ARN has mainly adopted a performance criterion”. Argentina
participates actively in the IAEA standards committee´s activities and
particularly in the international efforts to take account of the lessons
learned from the Fukushima accident. Therefore, the ARN regulatory standards
and guides take account of those lessons when they are incorporated in IAEA
standards.

The Nuclear Regulatory Authority
of Argentina evaluates the radiological and nuclear emergency procedures in
case of accidental situations in facilities under its control. Which actions
are to be taken, who will take them and how they will be taken are the highlights
of the emergency plan on which intervention is based. This plan contains all
procedures to be followed in the event of an accident condition. For major
facilities, the licensee shall take full responsibility for implementing an
emergency plan; for minor practices, emergency procedures are required to
contain accidents and minimize their consequences.

In accordance with its
duties, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority will take steps in a subsequent stage
to minimize injury and damage, which may result from any incident, accident or
radiological emergency, through its own Radiological Emergency Intervention
System (SIER). The SIER is intended to:

·        
Advise both users and public authorities involved in
radiological emergency control.

·        
To play a part as an intervening organization in the event
of emergencies which may arise in minor facilities and practices where
accidents cannot be provided with adequate containment or affect members of the
public, as well as in the event of radiological emergencies in public areas.

Topic B:
Enhancing IAEA Nuclear Safeguard implementation and efficiency

Argentina has currently, three
nuclear reactors generating about one-tenth of its electricity. Moreover, the Brazilian-Argentine
Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) was set up in
1991. This had led to the 1991 Quadripartite Agreement (INFCIRC 435) among ABACC,
Argentina, Brazil, and the IAEA which entered force in 1994 with full-scope
safeguards under IAEA auspices. In addition, Argentina has not signed the
Additional Protocol in relation to its safeguards agreements with the IAEA. Currently,
the country is a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. However, Argentina has signed
the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in 1995.

In 1994, the Nuclear
Regulatory Authority was formed and took over all regulatory functions from the
National Board on Nuclear Regulation (Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear, ENREN)
and National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The Nuclear Activity Law of 1997,
establishes the various roles of the CNEA and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority.

As well as radiation
protection, it is also responsible for safety, licensing and safeguards and it
reports to Mauricio Macri who is the current president of Argentina. Safeguards
and the nuclear non-proliferation assurances are an essential part of the
Argentine regulatory system. They are a group of requirements and procedures
applicable to both the nuclear materials and other materials, equipment and
information of nuclear interest, aimed at ensuring, with a reasonable degree of
certainty, that such elements are not intended for an unauthorized use, and
that the international agreements signed in this matter are appropriately
respected.

The safeguards may be
national or international in nature, with the international safeguards being
divided into regional and global. National safeguards are defined by the
provisions set forth in the regulatory framework adopted by each State. In the
case of Argentina, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority has established the
guidelines of the Argentine Accountancy and Control System for nuclear
materials and other materials, equipment and facilities of nuclear interest.

As far as the international
safeguards and non-proliferation assurances are concerned, their application
proceeds in accordance with the provisions of the agreements on
non-proliferation of nuclear weapons ratified by Argentina. In this case, the
safeguards may be applied by regional or global international organizations and
are aimed at detecting within reasonable time and a reasonable degree of
certainty the diversion of “significant amounts” of nuclear materials
for purposes banned by the agreements by which those safeguards are applied.

 

 

 

References:

http://world-nuclear.org/information-library/country-profiles/countries-a-f/argentina.aspx

http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/cnpp2009/countryprofiles/Argentina/Argentina2004.htm

http://www.nti.org/learn/countries/argentina/

https://www-ns.iaea.org/downloads/ni/safety_convention/6th-national-report-argentina.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Position Paper

By Hassan Sajid AS – A

Committee: International Atomic Energy
Agency

Country: Argentina

As
a member of the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency,
Argentina has been a strong voice in support of nuclear non-proliferation
efforts.

Topic A:
Nuclear Disasters: Impact, Prevention and Response

Ever since the Chernobyl
nuclear disaster that occurred in 1986, numerous number of treaties were
introduced by the IAEA. Argentina has successfully signed them. Firstly,
Argentina has signed The Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1994 which is the standard
name given to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin
America and the Caribbean. In addition, the Convention
on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency
and the Convention on Early Notification
of a Nuclear Accident were introduced in 26 September 1986, and in 1990,
Argentina had signed those conventions.

According to The Argentinean
Nuclear Safety Report that was published in 2010, the standards of Nuclear Regulatory
Authority were compared against IAEA’s standards, and concluded that the “Argentine
regulatory standards are completely consistent with IAEA’s corresponding
standards, considering that ARN has mainly adopted a performance criterion”. Argentina
participates actively in the IAEA standards committee´s activities and
particularly in the international efforts to take account of the lessons
learned from the Fukushima accident. Therefore, the ARN regulatory standards
and guides take account of those lessons when they are incorporated in IAEA
standards.

The Nuclear Regulatory Authority
of Argentina evaluates the radiological and nuclear emergency procedures in
case of accidental situations in facilities under its control. Which actions
are to be taken, who will take them and how they will be taken are the highlights
of the emergency plan on which intervention is based. This plan contains all
procedures to be followed in the event of an accident condition. For major
facilities, the licensee shall take full responsibility for implementing an
emergency plan; for minor practices, emergency procedures are required to
contain accidents and minimize their consequences.

In accordance with its
duties, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority will take steps in a subsequent stage
to minimize injury and damage, which may result from any incident, accident or
radiological emergency, through its own Radiological Emergency Intervention
System (SIER). The SIER is intended to:

·        
Advise both users and public authorities involved in
radiological emergency control.

·        
To play a part as an intervening organization in the event
of emergencies which may arise in minor facilities and practices where
accidents cannot be provided with adequate containment or affect members of the
public, as well as in the event of radiological emergencies in public areas.

Topic B:
Enhancing IAEA Nuclear Safeguard implementation and efficiency

Argentina has currently, three
nuclear reactors generating about one-tenth of its electricity. Moreover, the Brazilian-Argentine
Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) was set up in
1991. This had led to the 1991 Quadripartite Agreement (INFCIRC 435) among ABACC,
Argentina, Brazil, and the IAEA which entered force in 1994 with full-scope
safeguards under IAEA auspices. In addition, Argentina has not signed the
Additional Protocol in relation to its safeguards agreements with the IAEA. Currently,
the country is a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. However, Argentina has signed
the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in 1995.

In 1994, the Nuclear
Regulatory Authority was formed and took over all regulatory functions from the
National Board on Nuclear Regulation (Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear, ENREN)
and National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). The Nuclear Activity Law of 1997,
establishes the various roles of the CNEA and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority.

As well as radiation
protection, it is also responsible for safety, licensing and safeguards and it
reports to Mauricio Macri who is the current president of Argentina. Safeguards
and the nuclear non-proliferation assurances are an essential part of the
Argentine regulatory system. They are a group of requirements and procedures
applicable to both the nuclear materials and other materials, equipment and
information of nuclear interest, aimed at ensuring, with a reasonable degree of
certainty, that such elements are not intended for an unauthorized use, and
that the international agreements signed in this matter are appropriately
respected.

The safeguards may be
national or international in nature, with the international safeguards being
divided into regional and global. National safeguards are defined by the
provisions set forth in the regulatory framework adopted by each State. In the
case of Argentina, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority has established the
guidelines of the Argentine Accountancy and Control System for nuclear
materials and other materials, equipment and facilities of nuclear interest.

As far as the international
safeguards and non-proliferation assurances are concerned, their application
proceeds in accordance with the provisions of the agreements on
non-proliferation of nuclear weapons ratified by Argentina. In this case, the
safeguards may be applied by regional or global international organizations and
are aimed at detecting within reasonable time and a reasonable degree of
certainty the diversion of “significant amounts” of nuclear materials
for purposes banned by the agreements by which those safeguards are applied.

 

 

 

References:

http://world-nuclear.org/information-library/country-profiles/countries-a-f/argentina.aspx

http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/cnpp2009/countryprofiles/Argentina/Argentina2004.htm

http://www.nti.org/learn/countries/argentina/

https://www-ns.iaea.org/downloads/ni/safety_convention/6th-national-report-argentina.pdf